An offer for those recently laid off by Tokyopop

I hope this doesn’t seem inappropriate, but I wanted to make an offer in the wake of the layoffs at Tokyopop. I’d like to conduct short e-mail interviews with any of the former employees who are interested to give them an opportunity to talk about their work experience, education and training, and professional aspirations, in the comics industry or elsewhere. This isn’t intended as an opportunity to bag on Tokyopop; it’s really just a way to recognize individual contributions of people who may never have gotten much notice for their efforts, and to help them put their names out there to prospective employers.

If you’re interested (and I’ll take absolutely no offense if you have better things to do, or, as I mentioned before, find the whole idea off-putting), drop me an e-mail at DavidPWelsh at Yahoo dot com or dwelsh at gmail dot com, and I’ll fire some basic questions your way. If you’ve already got a resume online or some other kind of web presence that covers the material, just send me a link, and I’ll be happy to post it as well.

9 Responses to An offer for those recently laid off by Tokyopop

  1. [...] One former employee condemns Tokyopop for the way they went about letting people go. David Welsh reaches out to those who were laid off, looking to talk to them about their work and their hopes for the future. (Image from a headier time [...]

  2. lookingforwork says:

    David, awesome, really appreciate you doing this, but unfortunately all the folks who were laid off are having to sign paperwork (in order to get their severance pay…) that forbids them to talk about their experiences… I think this might keep people from sharing with you.

  3. Unemployed says:

    Even those of us without severance packages are sworn to silence just to get a measly return. Desperate times indeed. ;_;

    The promotional side of the offer is probably ok though…right?

  4. Michelle says:

    I think it’s the most ridiculous thing. I mean, confidentiality agreements saying you can’t tell about special licenses, or things, within the company is fine. But not being able to share what you did within the company and what part you played? Or even whether you were happy with it?

    The only companies who’d do such a thing is a company that’s afraid it’s former employees dislike it, obviously because it knows it’s doing something wrong.

  5. [...] should have foreseen. Apparently, the employees recently cut loose by Tokyopop were asked to sign a non-disclosure agreement of some sort in order to receive their severance pay, which makes exit interviews a little difficult. I [...]

  6. [...] Tokyopop during a recent restructuring was Peter Ahlstrom. Peter was kind enough to respond to my interview offer, and after carefully reviewing a non-disclosure agreement, he submitted the following responses to [...]

  7. [...] Tokyopop during a recent restructuring was Trond Knutsen. Trond was kind enough to respond to my interview offer, and he submitted the following responses to my [...]

  8. [...] Tokyopop during a recent restructuring was Keila N. Ramos. Keila was kind enough to respond to my interview offer, and she submitted the following responses to my [...]

  9. spiritrans says:

    Thanks for doing this series of interviews. It’s an eye-opener for all the young ones growing up with stars in their eyes about working in the manga interview. I never worked for Tokyopop but I know people who did. It’s not all bad, but it wasn’t all roses either.

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