Around the blogosphere

April 11, 2005

While I’ll miss Kevin Melrose’s invaluable blog, Thought Balloons, I’m really looking forward to his offerings on Dark, But Shining, which he describes as “a group blog dedicated to reviews, essays and the like.”

Two of my favorite blogs have new looks. Love Manga has shaken off the Blogger yoke in favor of a nice, new layout. (While you’re there, make sure and read David Taylor’s thoughts on the cover of Shojo Beat.) And comics.212.net has assumed an appealingly springy palate. (There’s also a great entry on the value of negativity.)

Oh, and Spatula Forum has modified the entry procedure for its Jay’s Days Contest. Click here for details.


Sedentary weekend round-up

April 11, 2005

While there was lots of outdoor activity over the weekend, I’m happy to say it wasn’t all toil. I spent plenty of time sitting on my ass doing inconsequential things.

I went on a mini manga binge, picking up first volumes of Negima and Wallflower. Laden as it is with fan service, I feel like I shouldn’t have enjoyed Negima, but darned if it didn’t sneak under my critical defenses. I’ll have to figure out precisely why that is, won’t I? Wallflower was reasonably entertaining, too, though I can’t say I’ve been sitting on the edge of my chair waiting for the comic bold enough to feature frequent projectile nosebleeds.

Freedom Force vs. the 3rd Reich had completely fallen off my geek radar, so it was nice to see it at the game shop. Unfortunately, I apparently need to download some new video driver thingie for it to play properly, which is kind of annoying. I just want to load the game and play the game, y’know? I don’t feel like I should have to take night courses at ITT Tech to zap super-villains and their henchmen.

Is it just me, or was last night’s Desperate Housewives the weakest episode so far? Almost everyone was just so annoying, particularly Lynette, who has gone from amusingly frazzled to downright unpleasant. (And those kids… god. Enough, already!) I’ve always been very fond of Lesley Ann Warren and her aging-ditz routine, but she didn’t work in this context, and the sooner she leaves, the better. The whole tone of the episode seemed to be off, without sufficient humor or irony to balance out the darker elements. (This excludes the brilliant Harriet Sansom Harris, who brings just the right balance of absurdity and menace to her role. Love her. Oh, and it excludes Marcia Cross, too, because she’s awesome.)

Oh, and I wrote another column.