The shop around the corner

August 29, 2006

Brigid at MangaBlog, Kevin Melrose at Blog@Newsarama, and David Taylor at Love Manga have already covered ICv2’s interview with Tokyopop’s Mike Kiley, so I’ll limit myself to just one reaction: I have to go to their web site to buy Dragon Head?

Oh, hell.

Between that and my somewhat belated realization that DMP has put Bambi and Her Pink Gun on hiatus, it looks like I’m going to have to find some new twisted and violent manga to fill that reading niche. At least I still have Eden and Anne Freaks, the latter of which releases a new volume this week.

Aside from that (and Anne Freaks doesn’t seem to be shipping to my shop of choice this week anyways), there isn’t really any reason for me to hit the LCS on Wednesday. That probably should depress me at least a little bit, but construction, traffic and parking are all so horrible in town at the moment that I’m really, really relieved.

I’ll head over to the bookstore instead and pick up some recommended titles. And I have a coupon!


The revolution will be downloadable

August 29, 2006

Bill Flanagan has some thoughts on just why Tokyopop might be offering on-line exclusives over at Sensei’s Ramblings. It’s an interesting look at the costs and perils of getting a book onto the shelves, and Flanagan ends it on an optimistic note:

“If a publisher can sell weird and off-beat manga from their site and still make a profit, it means that there is a viable avenue for things like more Josei manga, more quirky seinen manga, more older manga, and more of any other genre that doesn’t do well in retail by giving them a way of succeeding on fewer units sold.”

Flangan’s piece does make me wonder if the possibility of a sleeper manga hit – a title that builds an audience slowly but surely over time – really exists in manga publishing. How many titles are on the shelves at all because they’re being subsidized by their publisher’s hit books?

Speaking of Tokyopop, there’s an interview with CEO Stuart Levy in this week’s Publishers Weekly Comics Week. It’s pretty much what you’d expect, only more so. Like… cubed.